South Dakota’s Great Places: Native American Scenic Byway

South Dakota's Native American Scenic Byway. (SD Department of Tourism photo) 

PIERRE, S.D. – Among the countless beautiful drives in South Dakota, one stands out as a unique opportunity for travelers. The Native American Scenic Byway is one of South Dakota’s Great Places.

The byway takes travelers on a journey north to south across the entire state of South Dakota. The total distance of the route is approximately 450 miles. The byway passes through five reservation and tribal lands including Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Lower Brule, Crow Creek, and Yankton.

Passing through the heart of the Great Sioux Nation in central South Dakota, visitors will experience not only the tribal history and culture, but breathtaking views as well. Much of the route follows the Missouri River, which provides views of bountiful wildlife, diverse landscapes and stunning vistas of rolling hills and river bluffs.

Memorial markers, interpretive signs, and monuments commemorate the heritage of the Lakota and Dakota nations and allow visitors to learn history from the Native American and early settlers’ points of view.

A few of the sites along the byway include Sakakawea and Sitting Bull Monuments, Mobridge; Fort Manual, Kennel; and Fischer’s Lilly Park, Fort Pierre, where Lewis and Clark met with Native Americans.

— From a S.D. Department of Tourism news release

About Author

Seth Tupper

Seth Tupper was born and raised in South Dakota and earned a bachelor's degree in journalism from South Dakota State University in 2001. After college, he worked at a newspaper in Minnesota and then returned to South Dakota in 2003 to join the staff of The Daily Republic in Mitchell, where he is currently the publisher. Seth has won numerous awards for his writing, including the 2007 Outstanding Young Journalist award in the daily newspapers category of the South Dakota Newspaper Association's Better Newspapers Contest. Seth's day-job and freelance work have granted him opportunities to meet hundreds of South Dakotans and travel across much of the state. He also spends a lot of his free time exploring South Dakota's state and national parks, hiking trails and kayak-friendly rivers.

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